Visiting Veryan

Veryan Round Houses

Veryan Round Houses


Information for Visitors
Veryan is a wonderful place to visit in its own right but is also an ideal base for exploring Cornwall as a whole. The parish extends along the coast from Pendower in the west to Portholland in the east and extends inland as far as the outskirts of Tregony. The main settlements are Veryan Churchtown, Veryan Green and the fishing village of Portloe. The parish also incorporates the hamlets of Trewartha, Treviskey, Carne and Camels.
Veryan Churchtown and Veryan Green are probably best known to the casual visitor for five, thatched, round houses, built by Parson Trist in the years between 1815 and 1818. The Revd Trist, who was a major landowner in the parish, perhaps thought they would make a decorative improvement to the appearance of his village. The estimated cost in 1810, when the design was proposed, was £42. The circular design might not seem particularly well suited to comfortable living but they were first described as “labourer’s cottages”. Given the date of their construction, the popular story that they were round to eliminate corners in which the Devil could hide is very unlikely to be true.
In the past local industries in Veryan included the burning of lime-stone in kilns at Portloe, Pendower beach and Veryan. Ochre was discovered in Veryan in the late 1800s but was mined for only a short time as it was uneconomic.
The Roseland Visitor Centre at St Mawes has a wealth of local knowledge for the benefit of visitors; places to stay such as B & Bs, hotels, guest houses, caravan and camping sites. Activities such as carnival dates, fetes, regattas, club fund raising activities. Shops; clothes, shoes, gifts, galleries, food, video hire, etc.
For details check the Visitor Centre web-site: www.roselandinfo.com

Food and Accommodation
There are a number of hotels, inns, restaurants and bed and breakfast establishments within the parish. For further information see the listings on our local business information page.

Local Attractions in the Parish

Pendower Beach

Carne Beach- a good, clean, safe sandy beach, with a National Trust car-park.
Carne Beacon- one of the largest Bronze Age burial mounds in Britain, the highest point in the parish at 370 feet above sea level, 125 feet in diameter and 30 feet high.

Rocks on Carne Beach

Rocks on Carne Beach

Pendower Beach- a outstandingly beautiful, clean, safe sandy beach, with a National Trust car park. See the Friends of Pendower Beach page on this site for more information about a proposal to develop the The Pendower Beach Hotel -popularly known as the Pink Hotel -which has been a familiar feature of the beach for many years.
Nare Head- road access, a car park and an easy walk to the top, a haunt of the Peregrine falcon and magnificent coastal views.
Portloe Harbour – a picturesque, tiny coastal village and harbour, still used by some small working boats.
East & West Portholland beaches (stoney) and beautiful scenery.

Gull Rock

Gull Rock

Elsewhere in Cornwall
The Roseland Peninsula
Because the Roseland peninsula is surrounded on three sides by water it has a unique character, a green and pleasant rural area speckled with small and pretty villages and hamlets, in the past traditionally the home of farmers and fishermen and the odd smuggler. Now it has become popular for its quiet and relaxed atmosphere and is a particular magnet for sailors and walkers – the coastal path around the peninsula provides an unparalleled experience for ramblers. The main villages are St Mawes, Portscatho, Veryan and Tregony.
Slightly Further Afield

Undoubtedly the best known is the Eden Project, just outside St Austell and only about 17 miles from Veryan, and now being extended. Closer to home are The Lost Gardens of Heligan, beautifully restored by the same individual, Tim Smit, who is also the driving force behind the Eden Project.
The impressive new Maritime Museum is in Falmouth,a ferry ride from St Mawes, housing a wide variety of marine artefacts and a tower overlooking the harbour with an underwater viewing room into the (somewhat muddy) harbour. For more information, see the official museum website.
For Sailors

The beautiful Fal estuary, said to be the third largest natural deep-water harbour in the world, is only a few short miles from Veryan, lapping the western side of the Roseland peninsula. On entering the estuary (the Carrick Roads), turn to starboard (right) for St Mawes and the Percuil river, which is a safe and picturesque haven for yachts and presents a busy and fascinating sight during the sailing season. The St Mawes Sailing Clubhas an extensive membership, both local and from other parts of the country, with an attractive and welcoming club-house looking out over St Mawes harbour. For details of facilities offered, including its excellent and popular training courses for children, see the club web-site.

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